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On Oct. 30, President Joe Biden issued an executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence.[1]

The executive order provides a sprawling list of directives aimed at establishing standards for AI safety and security and protecting privacy.

While the executive order acknowledges the executive branch’s lack of authority for any lawmaking or rulemaking

A number of federal privacy laws provide private rights of action, allowing individuals (or class actions) to bring claims alleging violations of certain privacy laws. Some examples of these statutes include the Video Privacy and Protection Act (VPPA), the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), and the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). What is more is

Yesterday, October 12, 2022, was the first time that a case under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) went to trial – and the result was a big win for the Plaintiffs, more than 44,000 truck drivers whose fingerprints were scanned for identity verification purposes without any informed permission or notice. BIPA is an

Today, October 7, 2022, President Joe Biden signed an executive order implementing a new privacy framework for data being shared between Europe and the United States. The new framework is called the “Trans-Atlantic Data Privacy Framework,” and it will (hopefully) serve to replace the prior framework, known as “Privacy Shield”, which was struck down by

California Attorney General Rob Bonta announced yesterday a settlement reached with beauty product retailer, Sephora, Inc. (Sephora), resolving allegations that Sephora violated various provisions of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA).  Specifically, it was alleged that Sephora failed to:

  • Disclose to consumers that it was selling their personal information
  • Process user requests to opt out

In July 2020, the Schrems II decision issued and the European Commission’s adequacy decision for the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework was invalidated.  Further, and broader than the invalidation of Privacy Shield adequacy decision, the Schrems II judgement found that US surveillance measures interfered with what are considered “fundamental rights” under EU law, i.e., the rights

On Friday, January 28, 2022, the California Office of Attorney General issued a press release announcing that California DOJ sent notices alleging non-compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to a number of businesses operating loyalty programs in California.  The press release stated, inter alia:

“Under the CCPA, businesses that offer financial incentives,

On August 13, 2018, the Associated Press published a story: “Google tracks your movements, like it or not.” According to the article, computer-science researchers at Princeton confirmed findings that “many Google services on Android devices and iPhones store your location data even if you’re using a privacy setting that says it will prevent