Google agrees to pay a historic $391.5 million to settle with attorneys general from 40 U.S. states for misleading users about its location tracking and collection practices. The settlement is the largest ever attorneys general-led consumer privacy settlement.

The attorneys general opened the Google investigation following a 2018 Associated Press article that revealed Google “records

Yesterday, October 12, 2022, was the first time that a case under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) went to trial – and the result was a big win for the Plaintiffs, more than 44,000 truck drivers whose fingerprints were scanned for identity verification purposes without any informed permission or notice. BIPA is an

In July 2020, the Schrems II decision issued and the European Commission’s adequacy decision for the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework was invalidated.  Further, and broader than the invalidation of Privacy Shield adequacy decision, the Schrems II judgement found that US surveillance measures interfered with what are considered “fundamental rights” under EU law, i.e., the rights

On Friday, January 28, 2022, the California Office of Attorney General issued a press release announcing that California DOJ sent notices alleging non-compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to a number of businesses operating loyalty programs in California.  The press release stated, inter alia:

“Under the CCPA, businesses that offer financial incentives,

It has been nearly a year and a half since the Schrems II decision issued in July 2020, which invalidated the European Commission’s adequacy decision for the EU-US Privacy Shield Framework.  As a result, companies were forced to reexamine their transfers of personal information out of the EU, and the safeguards that they rely on

While Europe is leveraging hefty fines against violators of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (here is a tracker of recent fines: https://www.enforcementtracker.com/), the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments last month on whether the FTC – the chief federal agency on privacy policy and enforcement since the 1970s – lacks authority

Just before the Christmas holidays, the Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) issued proposed rulemaking entitled “Requirements for Certain Transactions Involving Convertible Virtual Currency or Digital Assets.”  The proposed regulations seek to “require banks and money service businesses (“MSBs”) to submit reports, keep records, and verify the identity of customers in relation

Four Rothwell Figg attorneys, Jenny Colgate, Caitlin Wilmot, Martin Zoltick, and Jennifer Maisel, authored the U.S. section of Mondaq’s Data Privacy Comparative Guide.

Mondaq’s Comparative Guides provide an overview of key points of law and practice, and allows users to compare regulatory environments and laws across multiple jurisdictions on a global scale.