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At this point you have probably heard about one of the many incidents where an AI-enabled system discriminated against certain populations in settings ranging from healthcare, law enforcement, and hiring, among others. In response to this problem, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently proposed a strategy for identifying and managing bias in

As part of its three-part series on the future of human-computer interaction (HCI), Facebook Reality Labs recently published a blog post describing a wrist-based wearable device that uses electromyography (EMG) to translate electrical motor nerve signals that travel through the wrist to the hand into digital commands that can be used to control the functions

Website operators can consider a host of potential legal claims against entities that scrape their sites’ content without authorization, such as breach of a well-crafted terms of service agreement, copyright infringement, trespass, conversion, common law misappropriation, unfair competition, violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, misappropriation of trade secrets, and trademark infringement, among others. 

Pursuant to Section 6(b) of the FTC Act and a December 11, 2020, resolution of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) entitled “Resolution Directing use of Compulsory Process to Collect Information Regarding Social Media and Video Streaming Service Providers’ Privacy Practices,” the FTC has now issued orders requiring Facebook, WhatsApp, Snap, Twitter, YouTube, ByteDance,

Today the U.S. Supreme Court found in Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants, Inc. that the federal debt collection exemption to the Telephone Consumer Protection Act’s general prohibition on autodialed calls violates the First Amendment.  The Supreme Court held that the exemption was a content-based restriction on speech because it favors speech made

On May 28, President Donald Trump issued an executive order on preventing online censorship targeting the Communications Decency Act, or CDA, titled “Protection for good Samaritan blocking and screening of offensive material.”[1]

While there remain serious doubts as to the legality of the order, including the extent to which it is a constitutionally impermissible

Alabama, North Dakota, and South Carolina are the first states to announce that they will use Apple-Google’s exposure notification technology for their state COVID-19 tracking apps.  Several countries in Europe have already agreed to use the technology.

The Apple-Google technology uses Bluetooth to aid in COVID-19 exposure notification.  A user’s device with the technology enabled

Just last year the public was scrutinizing Big Tech for its collection and use of extraordinary amounts of data about people’s activities, from real-world location tracking to virtual lingering and clicks.  This scrutiny led to the landmark California Consumer Privacy Act, among other general privacy and data protection laws around the world. Will Big Tech